SUPA Wraps – Reusable Food Wraps

A colourful and longer-lasting, zero-waste solution for covering leftovers and dishes, wrapping sandwiches in lunchboxes or covering cheese and butter – just like cling film. Except SUPA Wraps (Single Use Plastic Alternative) are vibrantly printed fabrics infused with locally harvested beeswax.

SUPA was launched after founder, Karoline Hanks, visited Maputaland at the beginning of 2017. She was horrified to find one of the more remote stretches of beach (far from any community or river) strewn with bottle tops and other plastic debris, all of it so evidently from the ocean.

She described a profound and moving close encounter with a Leatherback female turtle laying her eggs. ‘Watching her return to the ocean, I had my heart in mouth, knowing the perils she faced in what is rather quickly becoming a plastic soup – all thanks to us. So what can I do? What can we all do? I asked myself.’

Start at an individual level? Karoline started making her own fresh produce fabric bags at home. ‘I marketed them and the demand grew. I soon realised that I needed to increase production and find others to make them for me!’ Karoline explains. Masiphumelele’s “Work for Love” sewing trainees took up the challenge and have produced well over 2000 bags since they started a few months ago, taking 10% on every bag. The fresh produce bags provide an excellent alternative to the single-use plastic barrier bags provided at fresh produce counters and till points.

The SUPA range will be extending its fresh produce fabric bags and shweshwe fabric wraps, to the “forget-me-not” SUPA pouch, which clips onto a handbag. This is stuffed with three collapsible shoppers and three fresh produce bags. The pouch is permanently clipped to one’s bag, so there is no longer the risk of leaving your reusables at home and finding yourself stranded at the till and obliged to take plastic shopping bags!

SUPA Wraps can purchased at Organic Zone, Faithful to Nature and Sustainable.co.za.  Find out more about SUPA Wraps and Fresh Produce Bags at www.facebook.com/SUPAlternatives.com/

 

Words of Wonder: Openings to the Natural World

By Caspar Henderson, Featured on the Ecologist

All too often language is used to objectify nature, writes Caspar Henderson. But there’s another, older vocabulary – introduced in this ‘counter-desecration phrasebook’ – that achieves the reverse: connecting us with the wonders of life and arousing delight in the natural world.

“The hollows of its trees were routes to other planets, its subterrane flowed with streams of silver, and its woods were threaded through with filaments of magical force. Within it children could shape-shift into bird, leaf, fish or water.”

Bedwos, crundle,rionnach maoim. Jammed against each other like pieces of rotting crud in landfill, the words may sound like nonsense – a line of Vogon poetry fromThe Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. But come closer, unfold them and listen.

Bedwos is a Welsh word for a grove of birch trees. Crundle, in the dialect of Hampshire and Sussex, means a thicket in a hollow through which a stream leads. The Gaelic phrase rionnach maoimrefers to the shadows cast on moorland by cumulus clouds moving across the sky on a bright and windy day.

Each denotes a capacity for attention, an echo of a life-way, in which, just possibly, ever-living joy and worth beyond price can be found.

That, at least, is the idea behind a project which Robert Macfarlane, one of Britain’s leading Nature writers, envisages in the introduction to Landmarks;

“We need now, urgently, a Counter-Desecration Phrasebook that would comprehend the world, a glossary of enchantment for the whole Earth which would allow Nature to talk back and would help us to listen.”

A delight and a fascination

And, interspersed through a set of eleven essays about some of the greatest writers in English about Nature and place, that is what he offers in this remarkable new book. In Landmarks, each stratum of a lexico-poetico-meteorologico-aesthetico Berlitz abuts a seam of ecologico-topographico-critico-politico belles-lettres.

As a phrasebook or glossary, Landmarks is a delight and a fascination. Its lumbering size and structure will, however, limit its use in the field. If you want to know the meaning ofglaab or wetchered, there is no overall index to show which sub-section of the nine completed sections – on Flatlands, Uplands, Waterlands, Coastlands, Underlands, Northlands, Edgelands, Earthlands and Woodlands – contains it.

Glaab, by the way, is a Shetland word for an opening between hills or between islands through which a distant object may be seen, while wetchered is what they say in Lincolnshire when you are wet through after being caught out in the rain.

The essays are vintage Macfarlane. They are studies of and reactions to the work of Nan Shepherd, the author of The Living Mountain, about her life in the Cairngorm mountains; Roger Deakin, who swam and wooded through the imaginations of millions of readers; J. A. Baker, obsessive of the peregrine falcon; and Richard Jefferies, Jacquetta Hawkes, John Muir and others less well known, including Peter Davidson and Richard Skelton.

Earlier versions of many of these pieces have appeared as introductions to new editions of works by these authors. (The introduction to Landmarks itself is a development of an influential essay first published in 2010.) They will be a great resource for those coming to them for the first time, and for others will richly repay rereading.

The ‘re-wonderment’ that language can bestow

Language isn’t thought, but it is a tool for thought, says the anthropologist and linguist Daniel L. Everett. But the power of this tool, for good or ill, should not be underestimated. Language that objectifies has, as Macfarlane writes, largely stunned the Earth out of wonder, facilitating the rendition of all living things and natural systems into a standing reserve ripe for exploitation.

But language is also “fundamental to the possibility of re-wonderment, for language does not just register experience, it produces it.”

And while every generation bears the weight of the past, it also creates new spaces of possibility. Preceding an astonishing revelation in the postscript to the book is a marvellous final chapter, drawing on work by Deb Wilenski and her colleagues, about the minds and words of children allowed to run free in a country park in north Cambridgeshire. As Macfarlane describes it,

“no map of it could ever be complete, for new stories seethed up from its soil, and its surfaces could give way at any moment. The hollows of its trees were routes to other planets, its subterrane flowed with streams of silver, and its woods were threaded through with filaments of magical force. Within it children could shape-shift into bird, leaf, fish or water.”

The book:Landmarks‘ by Robert Macfarlane is published by Hamish Hamilton, 2015.

Caspar Henderson is the author of ‘The Book of Barely Imagined Beings‘ and is currently writing ‘A New Map of Wonders’.

This article was originally published in Resurgence & Ecologist Magazine Issue 290 May/June 2015.

The fruits of one man’s labour

 

Ever since Adam and Eve ate the forbidden apple that gave them the knowledge to know they were naked, there has arguably never been a more iconic story about fruit ever written. However, an art professor in New York has given us somethintrees-3g to think about after creating a tree that produces 40 different types of fruit, all of which blossom harmoniously due to their specific nature.

trees-1 Professor Sam van Aken of Syracuse University has always had a keen interest in grafting trees. He was given the opportunity to acquire a 3-acre orchard from the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station where he began to graft buds from the 250 heritage varieties found on the orchard onto a single stock tree. Over the course of five years like a delicately sewn tapestry, Aken grafted similar fruits together onto the same tree, creating the 40 Fruit tree project.

To see more about this incredible project, take look at the video below:

https://youtu.be/ik3l4U_17bI

 

Original article sourced from: http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2015/07/this-grafted-tree-by-artist-sam-van-aken-grows-over-40-different-kinds-of-fruit/